Is it Snoring or Sleep Apnea?

Snoring and Sleep Apnea

Understanding the differences between sleep apnea and primary snoring is the first step to effective treatment of both conditions. For all the people across the country who are getting nudged or elbowed throughout the night from frustrated bed partners, it’s important to know what their snoring means, and how they can silence it.


Normal Snoring

Knowing the difference between the two conditions is key in determining proper treatment. Snoring is the result of tissues in the throat relaxing enough that they partially block the airway and vibrate, creating a sound. Depending on an individual’s anatomy and other lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption and body weight, the sound of the vibration can be louder or softer.


Obstructive Sleep Apnea (Apnoea) OSA

Loud frequent snoring is one of the indicators of OSA, which is a chronic condition characterized by pauses in breathing or shallow breaths during sleep. When people with OSA fall asleep, they can stop breathing for a few seconds to a minute or more. Both conditions can be caused or made worse by obesity, large tongue and tonsils, aging and head and neck shape.

People who snore make a vibrating, rattling, noisy sound while breathing during sleep. It may be a symptom of sleep apnea. Consult your doctor if you snore and have any of the following symptoms or signs:

# Excessive daytime sleepiness
# Morning headaches
# Recent weight gain
# Awakening in the morning not feeling rested
# Awaking at night feeling confused
# Change in your level of attention, concentration, or memory
# Observed pauses in breathing during sleep